Grand jury indicts man accused of tossing $6.3K worth of heroin from CPD chief’s car — and a judge tells him to stay in the house 24/7

Kenneth Miles | CPD

Kenneth Miles, the oft-convicted drug dealer accused of throwing $6,300 worth of heroin out of a car owned by CPD’s chief of internal affairs, is not having good luck in court. Miles also happens to be the police informant whose tip prompted CPD’s botched raid on Anjanette Young’s home in 2019, according to public records.

Things were going fine for a while. When prosecutors slapped him with felony heroin possession charges after cops removed him from Chief Yolanda Talley’s car on February 1, a judge said he could go home on his own recognizance with electronic monitoring.

At the time, Miles was already on bond for felony manufacture-delivery of fentanyl. The judge in that matter, Maria Kuriakos-Ciesil, could have raised his bail when he appeared in front of her two days after the Talley incident. Instead, Kuriakos-Ciesil released him on his own recognizance with electronic monitoring.

But electronic monitoring in Illinois isn’t what it used to be. State legislators last year decriminalized electronic monitoring absences of less than 48 hours. They also gave people on “EM” permission to leave the house two days a week to run errands.

That’s not bad for a guy who, for some reason, keeps getting arrested for allegedly participating in narcotics transactions on the streets near his home.

But the Cook County justice system’s smooth waters turned choppy after news broke that Miles was arrested while riding in the police chief’s car.

During a Zoom court hearing Friday, Judge Edward Maloney told Miles that, unlike other people on EM, he is no longer allowed to leave the house at all — and certainly not 48 hours at a time.

“Defendant is not allowed to leave the home for 48 hour furlough,” Maloney wrote in an order. “Defendant is allowed no movement.”

Maloney warned Miles that he would be arrested and held without bail if he left his home for any reason without explicit permission from the sheriff.

On Wednesday, Miles appeared in front of Maloney via Zoom again. There was more bad news.

Prosecutors announced that a grand jury had indicted Miles in the case involving Talley’s car. Maloney ordered him to appear at the Leighton Criminal Court House at 26th and California in person on March 16 for arraignment.

Fortuitously, Miles was already scheduled to appear before Judge Kuriakos-Ciesil at the same courthouse on the same day for his other case. Maloney seemed pleased by the convenience of it all as he plotted out Miles’ agenda for that day: “You can go to Room 101 for this and then see the judge in 206.”

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